What is the Fontan Procedure?

So as you know by now, Nolan is scheduled for his next heart surgery – called the Fontan Procedure – on Monday, June 6th. So what is the Fontan Procedure? Before we get into the specifics let’s step back a little bit and have a little review on the difference between a healthy heart and an HLHS heart:  
So now let’s talk a bit about Nolan’s second heart surgery, which was called the Glenn Procedure. In this surgery the superior vena cava – the vein that routes blood from the upper part of the body – is connected to the pulmonary artery. This helps with blood flow to the lungs. So currently as of writing this entry, his heart looks something like this:  

 This next – and hopefully final – surgery is going to look like a reverse (or flipped) version of the previous surgery. In the Fontan Procedure, the vein that routes blood from the lower part of the body is connected to the pulmonary artery. The vein won’t quite reach, so a conduit will be used to make the connections. At times, surgeons will add a fenestration to the Fontan, which I’ve seen sometimes called a “blowhole”. It will allow a pop-off if pressures get a little high. In Nolan’s case, adding a fenestration will be a decision made by the surgeon at the time of surgery. Once the surgery is complete, his heart will look like this:

   

The lungs will now have a passive system of blood flow, which will move on its own and Nolan’s single ventricle can work on pumping blood to the body. Why is this important? Basically he has half a heart doing double the work. As you can imagine, this is a lot of pressure on a tiny heart and the Glenn and Fontan Procedures will alleviate some of the work on his heart, which will allow him to grow and remain active. 

As far as complications go, there’s your usual: infection, bleeding, etc. This are par for the course. Nolan will have 3 chest tubes in, but hopefully he will drain well and can get those out as quickly as possible because from what I understand they’re quite uncomfortable. Recovery for the Fontan Procedure – if all goes well – is about a week. But: there is something that will delay that recovery, and that’s our good friend pleural effusions, which basically means fluid build-up around the lungs. This can be peed off or drain via the chest tubes. If the fluid exists, we just have to wait it out until it’s gone. If you can recall, Nolan’s Glenn recovery was only 5 days, but he still had fluid buildup so he was back in the hospital for a whole…seven…days. So this time around we’re gonna keep a close eye on it!

Of course, with any surgery, this is a very serious procedure. We’re putting his life in the hands of an amazing team at Levine Children’s Hospital and we’re confident they’re going to do an awesome job! As always, we appreciate the prayers and kind thoughts!

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About Chris Perez

My name is Chris aka HLHS Dad: I’m married with 3 sons. I love photography and the New York Yankees. I’m an admitted pizza snob and amateur balloon animal maker. Every now and then you can catch me being serious…but most of the time I’m quoting random commercials or lines from Pee Wee’s Big Adventure.

Posted on May 27, 2016, in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink. 6 Comments.

  1. Just realized this is coming up for you! Anxious for you, and hope things go smoothly! We are expecting our HLHS girl in two weeks, so I turned to blogs for inspiration. Thank you!

  2. Nina of the North

    My 2-year-old daughter had her Fontan 3 weeks ago. Including pre-op testing, we were in Boston for 2 weeks. So far, things have been better than expected. From here, it’s uncharted territory for us.

    Good luck to you and your little boy! I hope things go smoothly for you all.

  3. My son will be 28 in July and had is final Fontan done at the age of 4. Will be praying for you and family. Great Doctors at Levin.

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