The Long Wait (the recovery process)

After a long, exhausting day of waiting for Nolan’s surgery to be done, we were ready to begin to road to recovery.  As I’m sure you know, all heart kids are different, so recovery times can vary…but we were hoping for something like 2 weeks, 3 tops.  They managed to extubate Nolan late that same night and then they continued to work on stabilizing his blood pressure and managing his pain.  You could tell he was in some discomfort because his brow would furrow from time to time.

NolanFontan3

Eventually he settled down a little and even asked for some water and agreed to watch an ABC video (he is obsessed with he alphabet).  It seemed like he was showing some definite signs of himself.

Still, he did just go through a major surgery, so he was pretty agitated and restless.  He would try to toss and turn, I’m sure it was an effort to be more comfortable since he likes to sleep on his side.  He even almost rolled completely over at one point, it was like trying to hold down an angry eel.  But we settled him down.  His belly was distended so we held off on feeds for the time being and we just let his awesome medical team work their magic.  According to the physicians over the next several days, the Fontan looked like it was working properly and the fenestration was doing what it should.  If anything they wanted to keep an eye on some narrowing in his pulmonary artery, which they already ballooned once during his cath earlier this year.

Nolan continued to be restless and fussy and it was really difficult to keep him calm.  He was draining quite a bit from his chest tubes, which is good, and the plan was to get his belly to calm down and to get him up and moving to help with the drainage.  Eventually we got one chest tube out while the other continued to drain.  Every day they came to do an x-ray to see how his chest was doing and eventually they had to put in another chest tube.  I wasn’t thrilled about that, since those are obviously uncomfortable for him, but if it’s one step closer to home it needed to be done.

The biggest concern was around Father’s Day, where I noticed considerable weakness in Nolan’s arms.  In fact, he didn’t really move them.  I brought this up to his medical team, and the next day, and the next day, before someone finally looked into it.  That was extremely frustrating because, you know, you want to be heard as a parent.  But with his nurse’s help, we were able to advocate for a closer look.  They some neuro checkups and a couple EEGs to rule out any neurological problems, and determined that some big-time therapy would get that function back.

NolanFontan2

Eventually we got Nolan’s agitation under control and got him moved from the CVICU to the Progressive Unit.  While up there he was able to get out of the bed and ride around in the wagon and even got some visits from the therapy dogs.  We began some in-room therapy with him and he was happy to realize that those two little legs still worked great and were getting stronger.  We got feeds re-started on him and eventually both chest tubes came out and those daily x-rays looked clearer and clearer.

NolanFontan1

Now normally we would be discharged from the Progressive Unit and head home, but since Nolan was still very weak, we had to be transferred to the Rehab Unit.  This would be a whole new experience for us…

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About Chris Perez

My name is Chris aka HLHS Dad: I’m married with 3 sons. I love photography and the New York Yankees. I’m an admitted pizza snob and amateur balloon animal maker. Every now and then you can catch me being serious…but most of the time I’m quoting random commercials or lines from Pee Wee’s Big Adventure.

Posted on September 2, 2016, in Fontan, surgery and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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